Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Iran protests: citizen journalism

THERELIVE has compiled links to citizen journalists' reports on the protests shaking Iran. The recent post includes a list of the YouTube channels you will want to keep an eye on. And you will find links to timelines, twitter feeds, and live-bloggers.

4 comments:

  1. jotman,

    it is interesting that while US may say about lack of freedom in Iran (latest Forbes list of "most net-repressive regimes" has Iran as #1) - US itself has itse own supression of freedom.

    I have send you a message on tiwtter, here is that lin again, a twit from Max Kaiser (http://twitter.com/maxkeiser) today :

    "Interesting; US media tries to get into Iran while my show broadcasts from Tehran, finding its way into the US :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EVE3fSGXE70"

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  2. Reminds me of how hard it is to get Al Jazeera in the US. Seems that across 50 states, not one of the various cable plans offer it.

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  3. watch this clip :

    "Who is #Mousavi?" youtube clip : http://tr.im/pvoi #IranElections

    (from US TV program "Democracy now", Amy interviews some Iranian man )

    -----------------------------------------------

    Re: "Citizen journalism" in Iran

    it is said (in one of those articles to which I gave you links already) that very small portion of Iranians even use internet; then only 10K Iranians are reportedly use Twitter, and among those only 100 are actually active.

    well, I haven't seen the similar statistics for those who use Youtube, blogs, forums and other on-line shall we say "alternative media". but I guess that number is also not so big.

    and also it is emphasized that MOST of those who does use, and are active - are actually reside abroad, not inside Iran. and the remaining number, those who ARE in Iran - not many of them are actually on the streets anyway. while those who are on the streets - they hardly use internet or Twitter.

    so, it makes it a bit too early to consider the "citizen journalism" the dominant factor for the current events in Iran.

    it is said that the MAJORITY of the protesters actually use the more or less "old fashion" means - like phone calls, may be faxes too.

    note that yesterday there was an article (_ posted link on Twitter; I don't see this news in Thai media so far) - that Thai MICT is trying to implement the project of creating the so called "ICT centers" all over the country. I guess it is sort of "pro-active" move by Establishment to get ahead of opposition and firmly establish gov.'s dominance over the potential HUGE numbers of internet users in rural areas.

    clever, huh ?! ;)

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  4. ..note that yesterday there was an article (_ posted link on Twitter; I don't see this news in Thai media so far) - that Thai MICT is trying to implement the project of creating the so called "ICT centers" all over the country.

    I somehow doubt that despite their best efforts they will be able to keep up with the evolving technologies. Great way to waste a lot of money though.

    and also it is emphasized that MOST of those who does use, and are active - are actually reside abroad, not inside Iran. and the remaining number, those who ARE in Iran - not many of them are actually on the streets anyway. while those who are on the streets - they hardly use internet or Twitter.

    Aside from @persiankiwi, there aren't a lot of consistent sources in citizen journalism over there that we can name.

    Actually, you address the problem that I set up therelive to try to come to terms with.

    I originally thought I would be going through blogs, but I've been kind of confounded with what to make of a youtube channel registered in Australia, or so many supposed twitter citizen journalists.

    Whatever the source, context is really important I think.

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